About

Robert Mason is a Fellow of the Sectarianism, Proxies and De-sectarianisation project at Lancaster University and currently sits on the International Studies Association (ISA) Foreign Policy Analysis Section Executive Board. He was Associate Professor and Director of the Middle East Studies Center at The American University in Cairo 2016-19. He received his DPhil from the University of Exeter and is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

His research focuses on international relations, with a geographical focus on the Gulf. He is author or editor of numerous books, including Mediterranean and Transnational Security Cooperation (Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming), New Perspectives on Middle East Politics: Economy, Society and International Relations (AUC Press, forthcoming 2021), The Gulf States and the Horn of Africa: Interests, Influence and Instability with Simon Mabon (Manchester University Press, forthcoming), Reassessing Order and Disorder in the Middle East: Regional Imbalance or Disintegration? (Rowman and Littlefield, 2017), Egypt and the Gulf: A Renewed Regional Policy Alliance (Gerlach Press, 2016), Muslim Minority – State Relations: Violence, Integration and Policy (Palgrave Macmillan 2016), International Politics of the Arab Spring: Popular Unrest and Foreign Policy (Palgrave Macmillan 2014) and Foreign Policy in Iran and Saudi Arabia: Economics and Diplomacy in the Middle East (I. B. Tauris, 2014).

Robert has authored numerous articles, book chapters and working papers and his work has appeared in a range of peer reviewed journals including: Middle East Journal, Middle East Policy, British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, European Foreign Affairs Review, Canadian Foreign Policy Journal, and Third World Quarterly. 

His work has been funded by, among others, the European Union, LSE Middle East Centre and the British Institute for Persian Studies. He has held visiting positions at University of Oxford, Princeton University, London School of Economics, Sciences Po, Paris, NYU New York, and the King Faisal Center for Research and Islamic Studies, Riyadh.